Join me today on r/Fantasy for a discussion on short fiction!

I’m hosting an Ask Me Anything (AMA) session over on Reddit’s r/Fantasy today to promote Flying on the Ground, my collection of short fiction which came out earlier in the month.
 
The focus of the discussion is on short fiction. I found it a terrific experience for the soul looking back on all the short stories I included in the book, some years old and almost forgotten. It made me think about the impact the process of writing each one has had on my writing, my career and me as an individual. So today I wanted to talk about short stories with you all. How have they helped you? Do you enjoy writing them? Do they frustrate the fuck out of you?
When I was thinking about this, I decided to make a list of all the things and opportunities writing short fiction have given me.
  • Confidence. Belief that I can write stories that people want to read.

  • The ability to say a lot without saying much at all. There isn’t time for grand exposition and elaborate backstories. It’s straight to the point, revealing what’s necessary and relevant alone. It’s improved my characterisation as a result. Without the grace of chapters to introduce characters, you have to swiftly forge a bond between reader and protagonist.

  • It’s given me the freedom to hone my craft. A writer’s job is to tell stories, and the only way to get good at it is to practice. I learn something new with each story I write

  • Writing short fiction keeps me motivated. If I’m feeling the slog of writing longer fiction I can switch to something shorter

  • My experience writing short fiction has led to paid opportunities with local organisations.

  • It’s helped me grow my following.

Do you write short stories? If so, how have they helped your writing and career?

As I’m looking ahead to future projects, the idea of devoting a year or two to a novel doesn’t appeal to me as much after just doing so. And I cannot help but notice the changing nature of people’s attention spans. Reading a short story isn’t as much of a commitment as a novel. It’s partly because of these reasons that I’ve decided to shift entirely to writing short fiction for a while. What do you think the future has in store for short fiction? Can you see it growing more popular, or will the novel continue to dominate?

As a thank you for getting involved, everyone who comments will be entered into a competition to win copies of my two books, Flying on the Ground and A Fantasy Writers’ Handbook. I’ll announce the winner at the end of the AMA.

So head on over and get involved! Link below!
 

If you’d like more content like this, why not join my writing community? Everyone who joins receives a free ebook on the craft of writing, lists of publishers of short and long fantasy fiction, and a list of over 100 fantasy book reviewers. All you need to do is complete the form below!

About the author

Richie Billing writes fantasy fiction, historical fiction and stories of a darker nature. His short fiction has been published by, amongst others, Kzine, TANSTAAFL Press, Bewildering Stories, Liquid Imagination, The Magazine of History & Fiction, Aether and Ichor, and Far Horizons. His debut novel, Pariah's Lament, will be published by Fiction Vortex in Summer 2020. He co-hosts the podcast The Fantasy Writers’ Toolshed, a venture inspired by the requests of readers of his critically-acclaimed book, A Fantasy Writers’ Handbook. Most nights you can find him up into the wee hours scribbling away or watching the NBA. Find out more at www.richiebilling.com.

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