£0.99 Deal: A Fantasy Writers’ Handbook

Good people of the world, for the next 48 hours you can get yourself a copy of the acclaimed A Fantasy Writers' Handbook for just £0.99!  Why should you part with your hard-earned pound for this book? Well, here are the views of a few reviewers... You can read a bunch more reviews by clicking… Continue reading £0.99 Deal: A Fantasy Writers’ Handbook

A Fantasy Writer’s Guide to … Castles and Keeps: Part I

We've lost more than we know, but what we have retained has inspired some, if not all, of the greatest fantasy stories in one way or another. Taking the time to do a bit of research on what you're writing about will empower your storytelling and, hopefully, enthral your readers. Today we're besieging the fortifications which dominated the Middle Ages, and of course which feature in our beloved fantasy genre.

The Pigeon Catchers

November is upon us and the cold of winter is beginning to bite. Reading is perhaps one of the best pass times when it's too chilly to venture outside. So to keep you occupied, I'm delighted to be able to bring you a new story of mine, The Pigeon Catchers, which has today been published by Far Horizons in their quarterly ezine.

Exciting news!

Today is turning out to be a busy day. Over at r/Fantasy I'm in the firing line for Writer of the Day where you can ask me anything you like. Click here here to check it out. We're kicking things off about 1pm GMT. And I'm very excited to announce that Ducks is now available… Continue reading Exciting news!

Writer’s Resources: List of fantasy publishers (short fiction)

It's a stormy Monday, but I have something to banish the clouds. I'm delighted to announce the creation of my Writer's Resources page. Here I'll be adding any bits of info to help you on your quest, and I could think of no better way to kick things off than with a table of fantasy publishers (short fiction).

7 tips to help with editing

It’s Thursday. How about a little blast from the recent past? #tbt


If you’d like more writing tips you can get my eBook, This Craft We Call Writing: Volume One, for free by completing the form below. Inside you’ll find over 150 pages covering everything from dialogue, characterisation, prose and plotting, to world-building, writing fight scenes and viewpoint.

Richie Billing

If you’d like more writing tips you can get my eBook, This Craft We Call Writing: Volume One, for free by completing the form below. Inside you’ll find over 150 pages covering everything from dialogue, characterisation, prose and plotting, to world-building, writing fight scenes and viewpoint.


For some writers editing is the most loathsome part of the process. For others it’s their favourite. Yet undoubtedly it’s the most important, and given the rise in popularity of self-publishing, it’s more crucial than ever to know how to edit your work.

Entire books have been written on editing—I’ve listed a few you could stick your nose into at the end—but this week we’ll look at just a few of the best tips to help you with the editing process.

To write is human, to edit is divine.”

Stephen King

1. Put it away

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You’ve just finished your first draft…

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Viewpoint, tense, and narrative distance

This week I’m taking us on a tour of something which gets taken for granted: viewpoint. Viewpoint, in a nutshell, is the perspective through which your story is told, the eyes observing what happens. Most would say there are three types of viewpoint, but to make things easier I’m going to say there’s four. Bear… Continue reading Viewpoint, tense, and narrative distance

7 Nifty Editing Tips

For some writers editing is the most loathsome part of the process. For others it’s their favourite. Yet undoubtedly it’s the most important, and given the rise in popularity of self-publishing, it’s more crucial than ever to know how to edit your work.

7 Ways To Improve Your Writing

I've learned many harsh lessons since I began writing fiction, all of which have helped me improve as a writer. In this article I thought I'd share how I came to learn those lessons.

Prose: Writing with the Senses

Merely communicating how something looks or sounds isn't enough to bring a story to life. Many people experience things through smells, touch, taste. In fact, these oft forgotten senses are some of the most powerful forms of description, things which can enrich a story and give it life.