5 Things I Learned Publishing AFWH

AFWH has been out for 2 weeks and I've at last had a chance to reflect on the experience. Here are 5 things I've learned, from pre-order campaigns to managing expectations

Making Monsters

I’m delighted to share with you a guest blog post I wrote for http://www.writingbad.org. This is part of my Fantasy Friday series (though please forgive it going live on Monday!).

Fantasy is a genre rich with imagined creatures and beasts. Creations which haunt our dreams and make us walk that little bit faster after dark. This article first looks at a few of the more common monsters and then explores some methods to assist you in becoming the next Dr. Frankenstein.

Thank you, Sam, from Writing Bad for letting me loose! I hope you enjoy it.


If you happen to enjoy what you find, why not stay in touch by signing up to my mailing list? Subscribers receive a list of 50 fantasy book reviewers, as well as a copy of This Craft We Call Writing: Volume One, a collection of writing techniques, advice, and guides looking at, amongst others, world-building, writing fight scenes, characterisation, plotting, editing and prose.

 

Writing Bad - Official Site

The fantasy genre is rich with imagined monsters, creatures, and beasts. Creations which haunt our dreams and make us walk that little bit faster after dark. This article will first look at a few of the more common monsters, and then will explore the methods to assist you in becoming the next Dr. Frankenstein.

Types of Monsters

Demons

Cthulhu_by_disse86-d9tq84iDemons are probably one of the most common types of monster I come across in fantasy. They feature in James Barclay’s Noonshade, quite heavily in Raymond Feist’s Riftwar Saga. H.P. Lovecraft had his famous demon, Cthulhu, and Tolkien his demon, Balrog. But what is a demon exactly? Let’s have a look at some of the most common tropes:

  • They are inherently associated with evil. Their desire is to break into our realm from whatever plane they come from and wreak havoc on life as we know it.
  • In terms of…

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The end of another year…

In June I began this blog with a post on the writing process. I was always a bit apprehensive about starting a blog. What have I got of worth to give to the world? I managed to shake that niggling thought.

Prose: “Tell me, and I’ll forget.” Showing Instead of Telling

In his book, On Writing, Sol Stein provides a very helpful guide on something writers so often hear about: showing the story instead of telling it. Do you remember asking someone, a family member perhaps, to tell you a story? It's almost as if we've been conditioned to tell rather than show.

Creative writing lectures

If you’d like more writing tips you can get my eBook, This Craft We Call Writing: Volume One, for free by completing the form below. Inside you’ll find over 150 pages covering everything from dialogue, characterisation, prose and plotting, to world-building, writing fight scenes, viewpoint, and much more! With NaNoWriMo a week in it's just… Continue reading Creative writing lectures

What the hell is NaNoWriMo?

I’ve seen this acronym all over the place lately. It sounds like a daemon H.P. Lovecraft forgot to make. Then I read a very helpful post by mylifewithbooksblog and all became clear.

Get yourself a free creative writing eBook

One of the things I love to do most in the world is helping you good people out in any way I can. Kindness can be a rare thing nowadays and it's always good to spread it around whenever possible. This is the philosophy behind The Writer's Tool Shed, and with the posts mounting up I've decided to compile those so far published into a free eBook—This Craft We Call Writing: Volume One. Over 150 pages of tips, hints, and guides on everything from dialogue, plotting, viewpoint and prose, to world-building, writing fight scenes and editing, complete with pictures! And it's totally free when you sign up to my mailing list!

The Bad Guys

After my research post looking at reasons why people stop reading a book, poor characterisation ranked top. I come across many articles looking at protagonists, but few to do with the bad guys, and a poorly characterised villain is just as off-putting as a poorly characterised hero. In this short article, you'll read a few simple ways to make your bad guys of pure evil more compelling, and your conflicted antagonists more intriguing.

Viewpoint, tense, and narrative distance

This week I’m taking us on a tour of something which gets taken for granted: viewpoint. Viewpoint, in a nutshell, is the perspective through which your story is told, the eyes observing what happens. Most would say there are three types of viewpoint, but to make things easier I’m going to say there’s four. Bear… Continue reading Viewpoint, tense, and narrative distance

Prose: The Orwellian Approach

For more writing tips and discussions on the fantasy genre, why not sign up to my mailing list? When you do, you’ll receive a free eBook on the craft of creative writing, featuring guides to world-building, writing fight scenes, plotting, viewpoint, editing, prose, and much, much more. Two styles of prose tend to dominate: clear,… Continue reading Prose: The Orwellian Approach