The Writer’s Toolshed

Real Writing Stories #2 – Forest Wells

Real Writing Stories returns for its second installment. This week, with the help of writer Forest Wells, I’m launching a new weekly feature called My Writing Day. Readers of The Guardian newspaper may have seen this before. A writer shares their average writing day—the process, the distractions, the strife, the achievements. The Guardian however looks at the writing days of more well-known writers only. They’re very insightful and inspirational pieces, but I think the stories of other writers at different stages in their journeys can be more interesting and relatable.

Real Writing Stories: Part One

The stories of fellow writers really inspire me to keep bashing away at the keyboard. Learning about other people’s journeys, the difficulties they’ve encountered and overcome, their unwaivering passion for writing, can help me get through days when I feel like giving up.

Music and Writing

A few posts ago I included a bit about listening to music while writing. I’m a lover of peace and quiet, but a few people came back to me with recommendations and since then I’ve experimented. Be it the grand classical music of Lord of the Rings, psychedelic jams or funky Latin rock, I’ve discovered a particular tune can really spur me on and help clock up all-important words.

11 Essential Ways To Stop Procrastinating

Procrastination has been so widely discussed in the writing community I know it’s not just me that suffers from this curse. Countless hours lost to daydreaming, scrolling through mundanity on the web, reading news articles on subjects I’ve never once shown an interest in. Sometimes I sit there ready to go and a thought pops into my mind. I’ve not cleaned those fish tanks in a few weeks. Another forty minutes goes by. Think of all the words that could have been written?

The Bad Guys – Tips On Writing A Villain

After my research post looking at reasons why people stop reading a book, poor characterisation ranked top. I come across many articles looking at protagonists, but few to do with the bad guys, and a poorly characterised villain is just as off-putting as a poorly characterised hero. In this short article, you’ll read a few simple ways to make your bad guys of pure evil more compelling, and your conflicted antagonists more intriguing.